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Affidavit from friends and family


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#1 TLB

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 09:16 PM

"they can be written in Chinese and then brought to a notary office for a notary translation."

So what's the process here? You start with an affidavit in Chinese, and then, rather than take it to be translated somewhere, you take it to the notary and ask for it to be notarized and translated there? And then are you done?

#2 dnoblett

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 09:19 AM

"they can be written in Chinese and then brought to a notary office for a notary translation."

So what's the process here? You start with an affidavit in Chinese, and then, rather than take it to be translated somewhere, you take it to the notary and ask for it to be notarized and translated there? And then are you done?

If in the USA simply write the letters in English, and have notarized.

#3 TLB

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 01:30 PM

If in the USA simply write the letters in English, and have notarized.


Yeah I can do that; I'm talking about the ones in Chinese from her family and friends.

#4 dnoblett

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 01:56 PM

Yeah I can do that; I'm talking about the ones in Chinese from her family and friends.

From USCIS:

Please submit certified translations for all foreign language documents. The translator must certify that s/he is competent to translate and that the translation is accurate.

The certification format should include the certifier's name, signature, address, and date of certification. A suggested format is:

Certification by Translator

I [typed name], certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and ________ languages, and that the above/attached document is an accurate translation of the document attached entitled ______________________________.

Signature_________________________________
Date Typed Name
Address

http://www.uscis.gov...00045f3d6a1RCRD

Translator could get their signature notarized.

Translator can be anyone conversant and fluent in both languages, need not be a professional service.

#5 Highlander 08 09 10 11

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 04:31 PM

If in the USA simply write the letters in English, and have notarized.

Do the forms filled out in China need to be notarized if they were written by somone who is fluent in English?

#6 dnoblett

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 04:54 PM

Do the forms filled out in China need to be notarized if they were written by somone who is fluent in English?

They should be to show that this is a Sworn Affidavit.

This can be handled by a notary officer at a US Consulate, if is a US Citizen providing the affidavit.

#7 concert500

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 05:58 PM

My wife Xiaoyan carried ten notarized Affidavits of Relationship from my mom and friends etc... into her interview and they wouldn't look at them. :angry:

#8 dnoblett

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 06:03 PM

My wife Xiaoyan carried ten notarized Affidavits of Relationship from my mom and friends etc... into her interview and they wouldn't look at them. :angry:

Typically these affidavits need to be included in the I-130 petition filing to USCIS per the I-130's instructions.

#9 tsap seui

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 08:10 PM

Typically these affidavits need to be included in the I-130 petition filing to USCIS per the I-130's instructions.



I can't stress enough, especially to someone starting an application....the first bunch of paperwork and evidence you send in is usually the only thing that the DOS will ever take from you or your woman. Her interview is NOT the time to hand in stuff. Those visa officers rarely ever take anything from your woman at her interview....Yes, there are a few folks whose VO's took something from them...THEY are the exception NOT the rule folks.

My wife's (then girlfriend) VO would not even look at my passport, she quickly and angerly threw it back through the window, as well as my consulate notorized "new" EOR letter. Then she proceeded to ask my wife eight or ten questions about my four trips to China "as she looked at her computer". Chances are, the VO already had my info from returning to POE and customs in America, from my trips and their dates to China.

An insider hint, the American VO's don't have the time to read all your evidence, it's the Chinese workers in the consulate that actually read your application and input things to the Americans. Hence, all the Chinese "visa people" who have offices in the consulate building. You think they are paying all that high rent and not making any money? Their real help is before the Americans see what the consulate staff writes in your case, not after you get a blue or white slip. Most of you have no clue how you've been helped, your girlfriend or wife ain't gonna tell ya. :lol:

TLB, it would have cost us a ton of rmb to get white books made up for the 7 Chinese friends and family members who wrote affadavits for us to send in with our I-130,,,,believe you me we tried every trick in the book and it came down to having to have a "white book" for each and every affadavit.

So, we had each person write their affadavit in Chinese, the lil' rabbit translated them into english on the computer and each person sat there and copied the translation onto a sheet of paper in their own hand and with a black pen.

Then that person went to a copy shop and at the bottom of the last page of their affadavit they had a color copy of their Chinese ID card (front and back) put onto their affadavit.

Each affadavit had their name, address, relationship to us, phone number, etc.

For the four Americans that wrote affadavits for us I had them include and sign a statement that read, "I hereby certify that the information I have given above is true to the best of my knowledge and belief".

It's one thing to get an American to write an affidavit for you, quite another to get them to take it to a notary. :lol:

For the Americans I made my own form that already had spaces for their name, relationship to us, address, etc., at the top of the form, the statement at the bottom is the very statement that the VA acknowledges as a sworn statement for any evidence you send in to them on an official claim. You don't have that statement, they won't look at your claim.

Good luck. :)

tsap seui

Edited by tsap seui, 01 September 2010 - 08:15 PM.


#10 TLB

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 09:26 PM

okay, sorry, one more time from the top (I apologize, I'm just really stupid I guess, I'm still not getting this).

Let's take an affidavit all the way through (and does a "white book" fit in here somewhere?)

1. friend or relative writes affidavit in Chinese
2. if wife knows someone who can translate, that person does so
3. translator fills out certification of translating competency (only in English?)
4. wife, person who wrote affidavit, and person who translated all go to notary (?)
5. all sign appropriate docs in front of notary

End result is 2 affidavits notarized and a certification of translator competency (also notarized) -- or are there two of these as well (one in Chinese)?

What have I got wrong?

Thanks again; I'm trying to tell my wife about this as she doesn't know, but I still need to wrap my head around exactly how to do it, A to Z.

#11 dnoblett

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 09:46 PM

okay, sorry, one more time from the top (I apologize, I'm just really stupid I guess, I'm still not getting this).

Let's take an affidavit all the way through (and does a "white book" fit in here somewhere?)

1. friend or relative writes affidavit in Chinese
2. if wife knows someone who can translate, that person does so
3. translator fills out certification of translating competency (only in English?)
4. wife, person who wrote affidavit, and person who translated all go to notary (?)
5. all sign appropriate docs in front of notary

End result is 2 affidavits notarized and a certification of translator competency (also notarized) -- or are there two of these as well (one in Chinese)?

What have I got wrong?

Thanks again; I'm trying to tell my wife about this as she doesn't know, but I still need to wrap my head around exactly how to do it, A to Z.

Two pieces of paper, Origional doc, and a translation with certification at the bottom of the translation. In China this can be done at a notary office, they can translate, certify the translation with a seal, and bind them together in a "White-Book" This is acceptable for USCIS.

#12 tsap seui

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 09:52 PM

okay, sorry, one more time from the top (I apologize, I'm just really stupid I guess, I'm still not getting this).

Let's take an affidavit all the way through (and does a "white book" fit in here somewhere?)

1. friend or relative writes affidavit in Chinese
2. if wife knows someone who can translate, that person does so
3. translator fills out certification of translating competency (only in English?)
4. wife, person who wrote affidavit, and person who translated all go to notary (?)
5. all sign appropriate docs in front of notary

End result is 2 affidavits notarized and a certification of translator competency (also notarized) -- or are there two of these as well (one in Chinese)?

What have I got wrong?

Thanks again; I'm trying to tell my wife about this as she doesn't know, but I still need to wrap my head around exactly how to do it, A to Z.


Sounds okay to me. You found a way around the expensive white books, and you got notarizations. All this is for Americans at USCIS and Guangzhou to read....no need to have one for the Chinese, they would let your wife come over here without all the hassle. :D

tsap seui

#13 TLB

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:20 PM

My wife is asking whether we need a "foreign certification" on these affidavits (外交认证) -- I've never heard of this; anyone know what this is and if it's needed? It seems a friend is suggesting we might need this. :angry:

#14 dnoblett

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 07:20 AM

My wife is asking whether we need a "foreign certification" on these affidavits (外交认证) -- I've never heard of this; anyone know what this is and if it's needed? It seems a friend is suggesting we might need this. :angry:

If they originate from the USA, then the person in the states can have it notorized in the USA by a Notary found at many banks, this is free.

If from China, then the notary translation will do.

Affidavits sworn to or affirmed by third parties having personal knowledge of the bona fides of the marital relationship. (Each affidavit must contain the full name and address, date and place of birth of the person making the affidavit, his or her relationship to the petitioner of beneficiary, if any, and complete information and details explaining how the person acquired his or her knowledge of your marriage);


link to www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-130instr.pdf

It just says "Affidavits sworn to or affirmed by third parties" Sworn to or affirmed means get it notarized.


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