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Gary Locke to Resign


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#1 Randy W

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 05:56 AM

I don't see this on the Consulate's web site, but this is from the Wall Street Journal

 

China’s Internet Users Bid Adieu to U.S. Ambassador Gary Locke

http://blogs.wsj.com...dor-gary-locke/
 

 

“When I met with President Obama earlier this month, I informed him of my decision to step down as Ambassador in early 2014 to rejoin my family in Seattle,” Mr. Locke said.
Mr. Locke’s wife and three children moved to Beijing with him in 2011 but returned to Seattle several months ago primarily so his eldest daughter could finish high school there, according to embassy staff. The staff said there was no official word yet on his replacement.

The U.S. ambassador has been in his post for 2 ½ years.

 

 



#2 Randy W

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 06:01 AM

I don't see it on the Beijing Embassy site, either, but the AP has released this

 


US ambassador to China to step down early in 2014

http://www.sunherald...-will-step.html



#3 Guest:ExChinaExpat_*

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:25 PM

It's not surprising that this is happening, and it's also not surprising that it's not being publically announced by the White House or Beijing. It's well-known that Locke is no fan of China and is a great supporter of Dali Lama. That is not the sort of mix for a good amabssador to any country.

 

I have to say, for a long time, there has been quite a disconnect between all kinds of behavior of the U.S. embassy in China and the new U.S. ambassador to China Gary Locke, and the scope of their official duty. They keep doing little tricks. People cannot refrain from asking, is this ambassador really obligated to actively engage himself in boosting Sino-U.S. relations and dissolving misunderstandings and disputes, or is he hellbent on finding faults and kicking up fusses in the Chinese society and creating new and larger rifts between the two countries? From the façade of a civilian life of flying with the economy class, carrying his own backpack, and buying coffee with coupons, to monitoring and publishing the embassy’s data of (Beijing) air quality and posing his nose into the debate on Beijing’s urban management, to his wantonly taking Chen Guangcheng into the embassy via abnormal means – What we can see, far from a prudent and discreet ambassador to China, is nothing but a typical U.S. politician who stir up antagonism. Whether this style of work, highly incompatible with his ambassadorship, is deliberate or unintended, and what, if it is intended, are its motive and purpose, are questions that everyone may wish to thrash over. This farce, orchestrated by the U.S. embassy, is a great lesson to Chinese people, and verifies once more the Chinese proverb: “A weasel paying respects to a chicken harbors no good intention.” Isn’t the intention they harbor abundantly clear?

Edited by GuangDongExpat, 20 November 2013 - 09:30 PM.


#4 Randy W

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:34 PM

 . . . from the Global Times this morning - not exactly a ringing endorsement

 

US Ambassador to China to step down

http://www.globaltim...er#.Uo1h4dJ9efM

 

As the first Chinese American ambassador to China, Locke drew huge attention when he and his family first arrived in Beijing. They impressed Chinese people by presenting an image of an ordinary family, carrying their luggage on their own without any attendants.

Amid the applause Locke won from the public praising his style, heated debates stirred as adverse voices arose saying Locke making a show was an American plot to stir citizens' resentment of their own leaders.

"His man-of-the-people show has been boosted by the media, but they forget he's here to sell American values," Wu Danhong, an assistant professor at the China University of Political Science and Law, told the Global Times, saying that people should not be deluded by the label of "ethnic Chinese."

Locke has engaged in public opinion disputes, faced with the strategic bilateral relationship between the two countries and the fact that Chinese society is undergoing a transformation, Lu Shiwei, a senior research fellow with Institute of Modern International Relations of Tsinghua University, told the Global Times.

 

 



#5 Randy W

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 05:23 AM

 . . . and the new guy

 


White House to nominate Baucus for ambassador to China

Three reasons why the White House is sending Max Baucus to China

 


President Obama’s decision to nominate Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-Mont.) as the next U.S. ambassador to China took many in Washington by surprise. But there are plenty of reasons why this was a smart move from the White House’s perspective. Here’s three.

 

 



#6 tsap seui

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 09:30 AM

Cough cough, well that's just great. There on the bottom, at least reason # 3 had anything, at all, to do with China.  :rotfl:

 

Forrest Gumps momma had it right.

 

tsap seui



#7 Randy W

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:56 AM

The word from the Global Times

 

Envoy’s personal views unlikely to change Sino-US ties http://www.globaltim...er#.UrOb4NIW3fU

 

Wherever their origins lie and whether they speak Chinese, they are representatives of Washington. Their first ID is politician, and the one and only mission they have is to maximize their country's interests in China.

In other words, it doesn't matter who will take office, because these politicians Washington sends to China will not alter the foundation of Sino-US relations, which are shaped by the extensive economic interdependence and geopolitical competition together. Their individual influence on this bilateral tie is limited.

It is too early to make comments on the new ambassador, no matter, if it be Baucus or not. But a breakthrough on mutual trust is what is absent from Sino-US relations. It needs to be included within the next ambassador's agenda.

 



#8 Guest:ExChinaExpat_*

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 01:45 PM

Here's a recent nominee for the new China ambassador. Oh yeah, he's extremely qualified! Not!

 



#9 Randy W

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 05:32 AM

from ABCNews

 

Chinese Media Outlet Uses Racial Slur at US Envoy

"Let's bid goodbye to the smog, and let's bid goodbye to the plague. Farewell, Gary Locke," ended the article, which was clearly inspired by Mao Zedong's 1949 piece, "Farewell, Leighton Stuart," that scoffed at the last American ambassador under the collapsing Nationalist government in Nanjing.

The piece shocked members of the Chinese public, who denounced the editorial as distasteful and offensive.

 

 

the Shanghaiist -

China News editorial calls outgoing US ambassador Gary Locke a 'rotten banana'

#10 lhp

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 12:30 AM

Pretty sad to see Locke treated that way. I voted for him for governor when I turned 18, and thought it was a nice coincidence that we were in Beijing at the same time.

 

One of his last interviews in the Chinese-language media was with Men's Health China. Here's a translation of it – I was impressed by his polite (political?) answers.

 

 

Gary Locke Talks Family, Fitness and His Reasons for Leaving China

 

Editor’s Note: Gary Locke has held the position of US Ambassador to China since 2011, and in November 2013 announced he was resigning the post to be with his family. Before he leaves, Locke agreed to an interview with Men’s Health China, editor in chief, Lin Dan. In this translated article Locke talks family, fitness and his reasons for leaving China.

Gary Locke, while serving as the US ambassador to China, has been a highly visible figure and has been able to maintain a good reputation amongst the Chinese people. Locke is an ABC, or American born Chinese, and has been the most hands-on ambassador to China. He has become a model example of how native Chinese can also achieve the American dream. Editor in chief of Men’s Health China Lin Dan invited Locke to sit down and talk about his time as ambassador. Lin decided to uncover a new side to the ambassador and spoke with Locke about health rather than politics. 

LD: Do you run? What do you think of the Beijing weather for running? Do you run outside?

GL: I ran outside a few times in Beijing with my daughter but I’m not very good at running. I love outdoor sports like golf and I like to be outdoors in general, whether it be working outside the house, climbing mountains in Seattle or walking along the Great Wall.

LD: Is this only if the weather is good?

GL: Bad weather does not affect me. I’m from Seattle which is a very rainy city. In Seattle, even if it is rainy, windy or cold, we play sports outside like golf, soccer or go jogging.

 


Edited by lhp, 05 March 2014 - 12:37 AM.

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#11 Multistrada

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 12:44 AM

I grew up in China and returned as an entrepreneur in 2011. Let me just say the seeing the events unfolding here makes me a bigger fan of America. Gary Locke was well liked just for being an educated, classy American - low key, budge-conscious, and polite. After people realized that this wasn't to make some sort of political statement, they began to question: why don't our officials stop acting like they are above all of us? I think this is what ticked off the official media: he erected a standard few Chinese officials have the class to meet.


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#12 Randy W

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 12:48 AM

I grew up in China and returned as an entrepreneur in 2011. Let me just say the seeing the events unfolding here makes me a bigger fan of America. Gary Locke was well liked just for being an educated, classy American - low key, budge-conscious, and polite. After people realized that this wasn't to make some sort of political statement, they began to question: why don't our officials stop acting like they are above all of us? I think this is what ticked off the official media: he erected a standard few Chinese officials have the class to meet.

 

VERY well said - thank you!

 

The ability and tendency to piss off a few Chinese officials is not necessarily a bad quality at all in a Chinese Ambassador.

 

His influence has definitely been felt, and in a lasting way.



#13 Multistrada

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 08:16 AM

Thanks Randy. He single-handedly made AQI known to ordinary Chinese people. While upsetting a lot of Beijing officials, he did the world a great favor (now my home state California is known to be affected by the blown air foul air).



#14 griz326

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 12:23 AM

...ahhhh, but now the Chinese get my former Senator, Max "the drunk" Baucus

 

>>>He single-handedly made AQI known to ordinary Chinese people

 

Really? The Chinese people I've known were very much aware of the poor air and water quality long, long ago. 

 

The ABC / banana thing, not knowing how to speak Chinese, and being a Dali Lama fan surely caused discord and could easily have been considered another insult to the Chinese government and the Chinese people by people like my brother-in-law. The newspaper's op-ed was uncharacteristically harsh for the China News Service.

 

My first time to China was on a diplomatic mission (I wasn't one of the diplomats, but the Deng govt extended privilege to all of us). I was shocked and saddened by the ignorance of Chinese culture demonstrated by the liaison office entourage. While it is true, a representative of our government, is just that, sending an empty suit quite the insult. ...although sometimes they succeed luckily.  

 

As for Max, I'm not sure he has actually lived in Montana for the last dozen or so years... As he said in that YouTube video, he's "no expert on China." At least he knows it. Maybe he'll read Henry Kissinger's "On China" and "World Order" which comes out this fall. He might also read a couple of Kissinger articles, such as: The future of US-Chinese Relations; conflict is a choice, not a necessity  and  Avoiding a US-China Cold War.    

 

I've met several POTUS', countless senators & congressmen, governors, and an assortment of bureaucrats. Kissinger stands alone as the most brilliant and gracious of the bunch. In the two hours he gave me, I tried to pick a fight, but he bobbed and weaved in ways that would have made Ali say "Wow," yet he never insulted me or made me feel small (I later did that to myself). 

 

So, I guess my point is that we haven't done nearly as good a job with China as we might have done. I'll be surprised if Max improves our batting average, but maybe he'll surprise me.

 

I hope so. We need to make China more than just a business partner. The global turn of events that we're seeing have the potential to become ugly and remaining on good terms is important.


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#15 Randy W

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 12:30 AM

 . . .

 

>>>He single-handedly made AQI known to ordinary Chinese people

 

Really? The Chinese people I've known were very much aware of the poor air and water quality long, long ago. 

 

 . . .

 

 

 

 

Yes - those who realized that it wasn't simply "haze", as they were told. What IS new, thanks to Gary Locke, is measurability, the availability of PM2.5 readings for many Chinese cities - they had previously denied the significance of these readings - and the acknowledgement that it is a problem.




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